Help me alleviate some pre-op concerns!

joben

Member
So, some of you may have saw my "Say Hello" post - I will probably be repeating myself a bit, but figured I had enough to say that it merited its own thread.
I do have a bit of a tendency to ramble and get long-winded, so apologies in advance...bear with me. :)

1. Some background: I'm a 30-y.o. male who's about 6'2" and currently about 380lbs. I would say that I've struggled with my weight for my whole life, but honestly "struggled" feels like the wrong word as for the most part I've just sort of accepted it and not given it much thought. Either way, it would at least be accurate to say that I've been overweight for pretty much as long as I can remember. I found an old 9th/10th grade football program, and at that time (so that would've been like...2006ish) I was listed at 6'0" and 250lbs. But, I've always just kind of been the "big guy" and never really cared too much one way or the other. I've tried diets here and there and nothing really worked but at the end of the day I'm happy with who I am and didn't feel super pressed to change much.

Anyways, about 18 months ago I got a new primary doctor and he had mentioned that I might be a good candidate for surgery and that we'd had a new bariatric surgeon move to the area who was pretty highly regarded (Dr. Bonanni). I didn't give it much thought, truthfully, but it was kind of in the back of my mind from that time. Two big things caused me to sort of start considering that more. First and foremost is that I had my first child. He's 5 months old, and obviously I want to be around as long as possible for him (and my wife, of course). Second is that I ended up catching COVID over the summer. I'm vaccinated and truthfully it was fairly mild, but I couldn't help but find myself thinking "this could potentially be a lot worse for me just because of my weight". Up until that point I hadn't really had any 'problems' due to my weight, so I hadn't considered the possibility of them coming up or the possibility of things that would perhaps be minor for others becoming a major issue for me.

So, I decided to pursue that option and got an appointment set up with Dr. Bonanni. Our first meeting was on August 2, and he recommended the DS for me as at the time my BMI (rounded up) was right at 50 and he felt that it would provide me with the best long-term results. Luckily for me, my insurance doesn't have any mandatory waiting period nor any required weight loss, so it is pretty much just the hospital's three-month program and that's it. I was also told my insurance would cover VSG, RNY, and DS, but not the SADI. I should add that Dr. Bonanni did mention the possibility of performing the traditional DS with a "modified" common channel so as to not have as severe malabsorption, in his words (as I remember them!) With all that in mind, I guess I'm looking at being eligible to schedule my surgery sometime around November of this year, more or less.

Part of me is definitely excited. But I'd be lying if I told you I wasn't finding myself just bombarded with all kinds of unexpected (and probably irrational!) fears/worries/doubts/etc. So that's why I'm here!

2. I'm quickly finding that I've got a lot of anxiety about hospitalization/medical procedures/surgery/etc. It's not like crippling or anything, but definitely making me more nervous than I thought I would be. I've never had any form of surgery nor anesthesia, save for local anesthetic for something small like a few stiches. So I'm awfully worried about having to get put under general anesthesia and the idea of having parts of me removed and reorganized really makes me shudder a bit. I know that both components (DS and general anesthesia) are generally very safe, but I still find myself being irrationally afraid of the surgeon nicking an artery and having me bleed out or the anesthesiologist being unable to wake me up or something like that. It's like...if I see a statistic that says "This surgery has a 1% mortality rate" for some reason my brain interprets that as "You're probably gonna die in the OR," haha. That's probably not particularly healthy, if I had to guess...As part of the hospital's surgical program I am set to meet with a psychologist in a couple of weeks, but I'm curious: Did any of you deal with similar fears/worries? What did you find helped to alleviate those fears? I am trying to remind myself that thankfully I'm still (relatively) healthy and young and that most complications are going to occur in patients who are a.) older than I am b.) heavier than I am or c.) have more preexisting conditions than I have, but you know how it goes...we don't always think as rationally as we would like. :p

3. It's kind of a weird worry to have at the moment, but I have a strange fear about just wasting away to skin and bones. I'm sure some of it has to do with your perception and what you're used to seeing but I feel like I see some people who have surgery done and lose so much weight that it starts looking unnatural. I like to weight lift and would hope to be able to keep doing that in order to maintain as much strength as I can and to stay a bit "filled out" but then I'd worry that I'll have a hard time getting in enough protein/nutrients etc to be able to account for what is lost through lifting on top of the already steep nutrient/supplementation requirements for DS to begin with.

4. I'm sure this is a common question but...clothes. How do you deal with the "in-between" or "transition" periods? About how long should one generally expect it to take for them to reach their "end" size? I can't afford to buy new clothes for each size-change (and I'm sure that's the case for most), so what are you doing to make that work? A lot of thrift-shopping? Buying things and wearing them until they're too big, or buying things a bit small knowing that you'll make your way into it?

5. One of my bigger concerns: I'm wondering if anyone has heard from any "senior-age" DS patients? I'm still relatively young and - from what I can tell - considerably below the average age for DS surgery. Does anyone have any record of/insight regarding living post-DS for (hopefully) 30, 40, 50 years?
I know that without losing the weight I probably don't make it to that age, but at the same time I feel like there's just not a ton of information (that I've found) for people living their lives with DS for that long, which kind of concerns me. I'm not super worried about long-term vitamin/supplement compliance (unless I happen to make it to a nursing home or something, haha) but I don't know... It just makes me worried that more "problems" will pop up down the road or something. Who's the oldest (person who's had DS the longest) vet in here?

6. Some simple recovery questions: I feel like I see a lot of horror stories about recovery but also see a lot of people talking like it was basically a breeze. Or, for example, I've seen many women who've had C-sections say that the recovery for that was a lot worse than DS/other WLS. Obviously I haven't (and won't!) ever have a c-section myself, but my wife did and so I was present for her recovery and she never made it seem unmanageable. On a scale of 1-10 with 1 being a walk in the park and 10 being a hike up Everest, how difficult did you find the recovery?
I've also been a stomach-sleeper for as long as I can remember. I can sometimes sleep on my side okay but have NEVER been able to get a good night's sleep on my back. I always just fall into a weird half-sleep and "wake up" some hours later feeling like I just laid down a few minutes ago and feeling very un-rested. I'm sure I'll have bigger things to worry about, but any idea how long it'll be before I'll be able to sleep on my stomach again? Should I just accept not getting a good sleep until I'm all patched up and recovered?
Also, as mentioned above: I have a five-month old. He weighs probably 15lbs, give or take I guess. I think was like 13 at his 4-month checkup. Will I be able to pick him up - or how long until I'll be able to do that?
How long did you take off from work? I work in IT so it's not particularly demanding. Sometimes have to move around PC components, but I'm sure they'd be willing to accommodate so that I don't have to lift anything heavy. I was roughly expecting to take off three weeks but I'm curious as to how long you were out for.

7. Did you see any "unexpected" benefits? I'm not sure the best way to put it. Like above, I've been heavy for my whole life but I don't feel particularly "limited" or "burdened" by my weight. Part of me wonders if I've just sort of always adapted to dealing with carrying all that extra weight around, so I don't feel like it's any extra effort, when in reality it actually is - I'm just used to it. It's like...imagine if you were wearing a backpack full of bricks for your whole life. You're used to it and it doesn't feel like "Extra" or like it's giving you any grief. But take the bricks out of that backpack and you'll sure notice - probably feel a lot more nimble and less "weighed-down" too. I don't know if that makes sense, but that's the best way I can phrase it...

8. AND finally...I guess I would say that my main worry (or one of them) at the moment is just that...I'm happy right now! I like the person that I am. I'm not miserable and I don't hate myself. I'm in relatively good emotional-health (although as you can see - a bit of a worrier). I don't LOVE the way I look, but frankly I just don't give it much consideration one way or another. All in all, I have a good life and I'm happy with what I have. I'm not interested in getting surgery because I think it will make me look better or improve my self-esteem or like myself more or be happier (Not judging anyone else's reasons, just looking at my own). I'm just doing it solely because I believe it's best for my long-term health prospects. If there was some sort of magic pill I could take that would guarantee me a full and full life with my family - even if I still was the same size and had trouble finding clothes or fitting on roller coasters - I'd take it in a heartbeat. I just want to be healthier; I don't want to change who I am. I don't need to be smaller to feel happy and fulfilled.
SO, with all that said - I guess I am just worried about making such a drastic change. I'm worried that I'll end up making myself miserable right now for health benefits that I potentially won't see for a long while yet. I'm worried that my personality/mood will change and I won't like who I become. I'm worried about messing up my "good life." I'm worried that in 30 years I'll be a mess or something because I've had to go so long with a modified digestive system.
I'm worried about the impact it'll have on my marriage. My wife and I have a great relationship, but I hear all these horror stories about how bariatric surgery ruins relationships or causes divorces and I just hate that. Like, to be perfectly honest I'd sooner not get the surgery and die sooner if getting the surgery meant it would ruin my marriage or something. I'd rather have a shorter lifespan with a happy and intact family than to live longer but see my relationship(s) fall apart and make my son grow up with divorced parents or whatnot. That's not really an option for me.
Basically: can you make such a drastic change without fundamentally changing who you are?

Anyways, you get the idea. I'm sure a lot of these worries are fairly common, but I figured this was a good place to get my head straightened out and to have some fears relieved. I have always been a bit of an over-thinker and tend to consider the worst-case scenario too often (I'm sure you're shocked). Has anybody else been in that boat? I appreciate any and all insight. My kudos to you if you made it all the way to the end. Thank you!!
 

southernlady

Administrator
Staff member
So, some of you may have saw my "Say Hello" post - I will probably be repeating myself a bit, but figured I had enough to say that it merited its own thread.
I do have a bit of a tendency to ramble and get long-winded, so apologies in advance...bear with me. :)

1. Some background: I'm a 30-y.o. male who's about 6'2" and currently about 380lbs. I would say that I've struggled with my weight for my whole life, but honestly "struggled" feels like the wrong word as for the most part I've just sort of accepted it and not given it much thought. Either way, it would at least be accurate to say that I've been overweight for pretty much as long as I can remember. I found an old 9th/10th grade football program, and at that time (so that would've been like...2006ish) I was listed at 6'0" and 250lbs. But, I've always just kind of been the "big guy" and never really cared too much one way or the other. I've tried diets here and there and nothing really worked but at the end of the day I'm happy with who I am and didn't feel super pressed to change much.

Anyways, about 18 months ago I got a new primary doctor and he had mentioned that I might be a good candidate for surgery and that we'd had a new bariatric surgeon move to the area who was pretty highly regarded (Dr. Bonanni). I didn't give it much thought, truthfully, but it was kind of in the back of my mind from that time. Two big things caused me to sort of start considering that more. First and foremost is that I had my first child. He's 5 months old, and obviously I want to be around as long as possible for him (and my wife, of course). Second is that I ended up catching COVID over the summer. I'm vaccinated and truthfully it was fairly mild, but I couldn't help but find myself thinking "this could potentially be a lot worse for me just because of my weight". Up until that point I hadn't really had any 'problems' due to my weight, so I hadn't considered the possibility of them coming up or the possibility of things that would perhaps be minor for others becoming a major issue for me.

So, I decided to pursue that option and got an appointment set up with Dr. Bonanni. Our first meeting was on August 2, and he recommended the DS for me as at the time my BMI (rounded up) was right at 50 and he felt that it would provide me with the best long-term results. Luckily for me, my insurance doesn't have any mandatory waiting period nor any required weight loss, so it is pretty much just the hospital's three-month program and that's it. I was also told my insurance would cover VSG, RNY, and DS, but not the SADI. I should add that Dr. Bonanni did mention the possibility of performing the traditional DS with a "modified" common channel so as to not have as severe malabsorption, in his words (as I remember them!) With all that in mind, I guess I'm looking at being eligible to schedule my surgery sometime around November of this year, more or less.
Whatever you do, don’t go higher than 125. 100 or the Hess Method is best.I’ll explain a bit better why lower down.
Part of me is definitely excited. But I'd be lying if I told you I wasn't finding myself just bombarded with all kinds of unexpected (and probably irrational!) fears/worries/doubts/etc. So that's why I'm here!
There is plenty of information on this forum. Read everything you can.

2. I'm quickly finding that I've got a lot of anxiety about hospitalization/medical procedures/surgery/etc. It's not like crippling or anything, but definitely making me more nervous than I thought I would be. I've never had any form of surgery nor anesthesia, save for local anesthetic for something small like a few stiches. So I'm awfully worried about having to get put under general anesthesia and the idea of having parts of me removed and reorganized really makes me shudder a bit. I know that both components (DS and general anesthesia) are generally very safe, but I still find myself being irrationally afraid of the surgeon nicking an artery and having me bleed out or the anesthesiologist being unable to wake me up or something like that. It's like...if I see a statistic that says "This surgery has a 1% mortality rate" for some reason my brain interprets that as "You're probably gonna die in the OR," haha. That's probably not particularly healthy, if I had to guess...As part of the hospital's surgical program I am set to meet with a psychologist in a couple of weeks, but I'm curious: Did any of you deal with similar fears/worries? What did you find helped to alleviate those fears? I am trying to remind myself that thankfully I'm still (relatively) healthy and young and that most complications are going to occur in patients who are a.) older than I am b.) heavier than I am or c.) have more preexisting conditions than I have, but you know how it goes...we don't always think as rationally as we would like. :p
This thread might help: https://bariatricfacts.org/threads/never-had-surgery-heres-what-to-expect.40/

3. It's kind of a weird worry to have at the moment, but I have a strange fear about just wasting away to skin and bones. I'm sure some of it has to do with your perception and what you're used to seeing but I feel like I see some people who have surgery done and lose so much weight that it starts looking unnatural. I like to weight lift and would hope to be able to keep doing that in order to maintain as much strength as I can and to stay a bit "filled out" but then I'd worry that I'll have a hard time getting in enough protein/nutrients etc to be able to account for what is lost through lifting on top of the already steep nutrient/supplementation requirements for DS to begin with.
Your brain is gonna mess with you. You will get body dysmorphia. The brain will see you as scrawny when if you had never been obese, you wouldn’t think a thing about how you look. But as long as you stay above 145 and your lab work is stellar, don’t stop it. My husband is 5’10” (okay, he was 11 years ago), had a BMI of just under 40. His common channel is 125. He ended up back in the high end of the overweight category due to his food choices. I was 5’4” when I had mine, my common channel is 175. (My starting BMI was 35.2 and my surgeon worried I’d loss too much, my lowest was 121 for a hot 10 seconds, a 22 BMI). This week, I weighed 140 which if you go by my weigh in weight is a 24 BMI. But due to me shrinking (age related), I’m still a 25 BMI.

4. I'm sure this is a common question but...clothes. How do you deal with the "in-between" or "transition" periods? About how long should one generally expect it to take for them to reach their "end" size? I can't afford to buy new clothes for each size-change (and I'm sure that's the case for most), so what are you doing to make that work? A lot of thrift-shopping? Buying things and wearing them until they're too big, or buying things a bit small knowing that you'll make your way into it?
Lots of trips to the thrift stores. I skipped an entire size one week. My husband, who also is a DSer, had to purchase a suit about three weeks before a wedding. He found a nice suit at a local thrift store. At the wedding, we had to pin his waistband tighter behind his jacket. He had gone down 2 sizes in three week.

5. One of my bigger concerns: I'm wondering if anyone has heard from any "senior-age" DS patients? I'm still relatively young and - from what I can tell - considerably below the average age for DS surgery. Does anyone have any record of/insight regarding living post-DS for (hopefully) 30, 40, 50 years?
I know that without losing the weight I probably don't make it to that age, but at the same time I feel like there's just not a ton of information (that I've found) for people living their lives with DS for that long, which kind of concerns me. I'm not super worried about long-term vitamin/supplement compliance (unless I happen to make it to a nursing home or something, haha) but I don't know... It just makes me worried that more "problems" will pop up down the road or something. Who's the oldest (person who's had DS the longest) vet in here?
Longest vet, about a handful. I know we have two who are around 20 years out, both Dr. Hess patients. Then there is DianaCox, Larra, Spiky Bugger are all past the 15 year mark, I think.
And most of us are not spring chickens. I’m only 10.5 years out and 67. There is a thread around here talking about living long enough to end up in a nursing home due to old age. I’ll see if I can find it. Edit: found it: https://bariatricfacts.org/threads/what-happens-when-we-get-old.2101/

6. Some simple recovery questions: I feel like I see a lot of horror stories about recovery but also see a lot of people talking like it was basically a breeze. Or, for example, I've seen many women who've had C-sections say that the recovery for that was a lot worse than DS/other WLS. Obviously I haven't (and won't!) ever have a c-section myself, but my wife did and so I was present for her recovery and she never made it seem unmanageable. On a scale of 1-10 with 1 being a walk in the park and 10 being a hike up Everest, how difficult did you find the recovery?
This is very individual as we all respond differently.
I've also been a stomach-sleeper for as long as I can remember. I can sometimes sleep on my side okay but have NEVER been able to get a good night's sleep on my back. I always just fall into a weird half-sleep and "wake up" some hours later feeling like I just laid down a few minutes ago and feeling very un-rested. I'm sure I'll have bigger things to worry about, but any idea how long it'll be before I'll be able to sleep on my stomach again? Should I just accept not getting a good sleep until I'm all patched up and recovered?
Use a recliner then. I was a back sleeper for quite a long time due to back surgery so sleeping on my back was a breeze.
Also, as mentioned above: I have a five-month old. He weighs probably 15lbs, give or take I guess. I think was like 13 at his 4-month checkup. Will I be able to pick him up - or how long until I'll be able to do that?
Ask your surgeon about your lifting restriction and for how long. Mine was no more than a gallon of milk for a minimum of 6 weeks, although he preferred 8.
How long did you take off from work? I work in IT so it's not particularly demanding. Sometimes have to move around PC components, but I'm sure they'd be willing to accommodate so that I don't have to lift anything heavy. I was roughly expecting to take off three weeks but I'm curious as to how long you were out for.
This is another one for your surgeon. 4 weeks would be okay, 6 weeks preferable. But it’s up to him.

7. Did you see any "unexpected" benefits? I'm not sure the best way to put it. Like above, I've been heavy for my whole life but I don't feel particularly "limited" or "burdened" by my weight. Part of me wonders if I've just sort of always adapted to dealing with carrying all that extra weight around, so I don't feel like it's any extra effort, when in reality it actually is - I'm just used to it. It's like...imagine if you were wearing a backpack full of bricks for your whole life. You're used to it and it doesn't feel like "Extra" or like it's giving you any grief. But take the bricks out of that backpack and you'll sure notice - probably feel a lot more nimble and less "weighed-down" too. I don't know if that makes sense, but that's the best way I can phrase it...
I watched for NSV’s. Things like being able to reach my feet, wrap a towel around me with NO GAP.

8. AND finally...I guess I would say that my main worry (or one of them) at the moment is just that...I'm happy right now! I like the person that I am. I'm not miserable and I don't hate myself. I'm in relatively good emotional-health (although as you can see - a bit of a worrier). I don't LOVE the way I look, but frankly I just don't give it much consideration one way or another. All in all, I have a good life and I'm happy with what I have. I'm not interested in getting surgery because I think it will make me look better or improve my self-esteem or like myself more or be happier (Not judging anyone else's reasons, just looking at my own). I'm just doing it solely because I believe it's best for my long-term health prospects. If there was some sort of magic pill I could take that would guarantee me a full and full life with my family - even if I still was the same size and had trouble finding clothes or fitting on roller coasters - I'd take it in a heartbeat. I just want to be healthier; I don't want to change who I am. I don't need to be smaller to feel happy and fulfilled.
SO, with all that said - I guess I am just worried about making such a drastic change. I'm worried that I'll end up making myself miserable right now for health benefits that I potentially won't see for a long while yet. I'm worried that my personality/mood will change and I won't like who I become. I'm worried about messing up my "good life." I'm worried that in 30 years I'll be a mess or something because I've had to go so long with a modified digestive system.
I'm worried about the impact it'll have on my marriage. My wife and I have a great relationship, but I hear all these horror stories about how bariatric surgery ruins relationships or causes divorces and I just hate that. Like, to be perfectly honest I'd sooner not get the surgery and die sooner if getting the surgery meant it would ruin my marriage or something. I'd rather have a shorter lifespan with a happy and intact family than to live longer but see my relationship(s) fall apart and make my son grow up with divorced parents or whatnot. That's not really an option for me.
Basically: can you make such a drastic change without fundamentally changing who you are?
I did it for my health. Not everyone who gets surgery has marriage issues. If you have a solid marriage now, it stands a good chance of lasting.

Anyways, you get the idea. I'm sure a lot of these worries are fairly common, but I figured this was a good place to get my head straightened out and to have some fears relieved. I have always been a bit of an over-thinker and tend to consider the worst-case scenario too often (I'm sure you're shocked). Has anybody else been in that boat? I appreciate any and all insight. My kudos to you if you made it all the way to the end. Thank you!!
Overthinking is common. What helps is to read everything here you can find. Also read everything at DSfacts.com and dssurger.com

Plan for worst case, but expect the best.
 
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hilary1617

First time at the rodeo.
^^^ See above. Well said!

Hi and welcome joben! DS was one of the best decisions I ever made. Thin or thick, I've never really liked my appearance, but like you have always been fairly confident and happy. It's easier to get clothes, more comfortable on airplanes, and has had no impact on my marriage, other than giving us more years on the planet to enjoy each other's company. Go for it!
 

Spiky Bugger

Well-Known Member
I’m one of the Senior Citizens (74 yrs old) and my DS will be 16 years old in two months. And my BMI was +/-50…and that was WITH the LapBand.

Others will have a host of good responses, but let me give you some unsolicited advice: GET A SLEEP STUDY! ASAP. If you have Sleep Apnea, you might NOT have bigger things to worry about. Your anesthesiologist will probably want to know if you have it. And, weight loss is one of the things that can make it go away. I’ll look at this thread again later. (Don’t run out and buy some over-the-counter appliance.)

 
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DianaCox

Bad Cop
18 years out, 68 years old. I was a few days short of 50 when I had my DS and I was back to work (desk job) at 3 weeks. I was exhausted, but OK. I DID have a C-section, and it was worse than my DS, which was laparoscopic except for an extended hand port around my navel - extended because the surgeon fixed an unexpected umbilical hernia while in the neighborhood. And I had a cholecystectomy and appendectomy at the same time. Don’t miss either one, nor the stretched out part of my stomach that was removed.

I’m a pain weenie. I was really annoyed that the surgeon took me off narcotics on day 3 and switched to Toridol, a strong NSAID. It worked just fine. You want to talk pain?? Plastic surgery on the arms. Abdominoplasty. The DS was a cakewalk in comparison.

You have to commit, without fail, to taking supplements for the rest of your life, every day, multiple times/day, and eating a lot of protein. Better than taking insulin, Lipitor, pain pills, hypertension pills, etc.
 

Munchkin

Full of Fairy Dust
Also 18 years post. The first DS was done in 1998 or so. I followed the first patient till he was 77 and I have no idea if he is still alive today. I will be 67 soon and I am healthy like horse. If I had done nothing about my weight, I would probably be dead or living a life full of limitations by now. I have no doubt at all I did the right thing.

Did you know the drugs they give you for hypertension, diabetes, and depression give you ED? Don't believe me, look it up for yourself. If you are a fat, male, diabetic there is a good chance your penis will retire long before you do. Sorry. And with the A1c you reported, you are right there. That right there is the only thing I would need to know. I would be waiting in line for surgery. Remember the libido you had at 18 or 20? It will come back postop. And all those prescription drugs are probably more expensive than the supplements.

After the DS and significant weight loss I scuba dived the world, rode a horse across Mexico, learned how to rappel, and I could run 8 or 10 miles. And ziplining was great fun too. You won't realize it yet but for 30, you already have limitations. And as you age, the FOMO will just get worse. There is a huge difference between existing and living.

I would have the DS once a year if I needed to! The surgery itself was a temporary inconvenience to fix a lifelong problem that was going to kill me anyway. I only wish I had had it done sooner.
 

Georgepds

Well-Known Member
Unexpected for me, I can now walk anywhere without thinking, stand at ease when I have to wait for something ( before I was always looking for a seat or leaning against a wall) and an take steps two at a time ( going upstairs used to like planning a trip up Mt Washington)

That, and I don't worry about seats, either fitting in or breaking them.

I was a lot like you, and never worried about my weight, well except for once when I was trying to land a new job at 50. I don't worry about it now. But narcissism affects us all. I still get a little shiver of delight when I meet someone I haven't seen in a while, and they say you look great. I know that they mean different, but what the heck, I'll take it.
 

Georgepds

Well-Known Member
Ummmm.... just a word of warning regarding cc length. The male experience may be different from the female. I don't have any references, so this is entirely anecdotal


I only know of 3 men * on this site. Myself and 2 others ( there may be more)


One died. I don't know how he died, but before he did, he complained here of weight loss he could not stop (~ 2 lbs/ week about a year after surgery). I think his cc was 110 cm


One had to have his cc lengthened because he was loosing too much weight. I don't know what his initial and final cc length was/is


Myself, my cc is 150 cm, and my ac is 150 cm. I'm fine, and lost the weight needed


Now, it's deuce difficult to measure the length of a meandering line ( it's a well known fractal problem in trying to ascertain a coast length). On top of this problem, the small intestine stretches. Try to do this accurately laproscipicaly while minimizing the time under anesthesia and it makes it all the more difficult. There is a post where the middle guy mentions the revision surgeon measured a different length than the original surgeon reported.


So, I would not push too hard on cc length... I'd trust the surgeon's recommendation and experience


OTOH, some women with much shorter cc have failed to reach their goals. Again, this is anecdote, and may just be an artifact of sample size. There are many more women here then men


*Oops... I just remembered I know 4 men, another guy named Don, last I heard, he's doing fine. I don't know what his cc is.
 
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Munchkin

Full of Fairy Dust
Ummmm.... just a word of warning regarding cc length. The male experience may be different from the female. I don't have any references, so this is entirely anecdotal


I only know of 3 men * on this site. Myself and 2 others ( there may be more)


One died. I don't know how he died, but before he did, he complained here of weight loss he could not stop (~ 2 lbs/ week about a year after surgery). I think his cc was 110 cm


One had to have his cc lengthened because he was loosing too much weight. I don't know what his initial and final cc length was/is


Myself, my cc is 150 cm, and my ac is 150 cm. I'm fine, and lost the weight needed


Now, it's deuce difficult to measure the length of a meandering line ( it's a well known fractal problem in trying to ascertain a coast length). On top of this problem, the small intestine stretches. Try to do this accurately laproscipicaly while minimizing the time under anesthesia and it makes it all the more difficult. There is a post where the middle guy mentions the revision surgeon measured a different length than the original surgeon reported.


So, I would not push too hard on cc length... I'd trust the surgeon's recommendation and experience


OTOH, some women with much shorter cc have failed to reach their goals. Again, this is anecdote, and may just be an artifact of sample size. There are many more women here then men


*Oops... I just remembered I know 4 men, another guy named Don, last I heard, he's doing fine. I don't know what his cc is.
Like it or not there does seem to be a manadvantage. I am not trying to be unfair or obtuse but MOST of us who have been around forever have probably noticed that men SEEM to do better than women. I know quite a few women who did not lose all they wanted to lose or gain back weight very easily. I am one of them. I am not saying these people are not better off. I am saying they did not lose what they wanted to lose.

I know only one male who never lost weight and his issues were all mental health related. He had/has serious issues.
 

joben

Member
Thanks all for the replies!
I went in last Friday to have an EGD and biopsy done. I know that's a really minimally invasive procedure all things considered, but I'd never had any form of surgery at all and it was the first time I had ever had any sort of anesthesia beyond topical/local numbing (pretty much just dental).
Honestly, the worst part (by far!) was simply getting my IV started. The first nurse went to start it in my forearm and said she hit a valve but was going to try and push through it and ended up blowing the vein. That was not particularly comfortable. The second nurse put it in the top of my hand and it wasn't bad at all. They didn't do "full" anesthesia ("monitored anesthesia care") but I couldn't tell you what the difference would be. I sure felt totally unconscious and didn't remember a thing from the procedure. But, 20 minutes later, it was all done and I was waking up...I was really groggy for a few more hours, but otherwise felt fine.
ANYWAYS, all that to say that while obviously the actual surgery will be a lot more involved and certainly a much more serious recover, I feel like just getting this step done really made me feel a lot better about the whole surgery process. Still kind of gives me the willies when I think about it too much, but now I feel a little more comfortable having got a small taste of some of the processes.

So, beyond that, I'm not super worried about the dietary restrictions or vitamin requirements. I already take a few vitamins daily as well as my hydrochlorothiazide, so I don't have a big problem with regularly scheduled pills, it'll just be more pills involved is all. I can handle that! Mostly I guess I am just worried about the potential amount of time "post-switch." It's good to hear that we have a handful of people here who are pushing 15, 20 years after DS, but at the same time I sure hope to make it considerably longer than that! :p (OF course, it sounds like those folks should be here for plenty more years too, so I guess it works out!) I guess also as I understand it the current traditional DS was first done in the 80s? So the very first patients would just now be pushing on 40ish years by this point. Given that it is not a particularly common surgery either I guess it's understandable that there aren't too many 25, 30+ years DS'ers to hear from, haha.

I also recently just recently learned that it is possible in some cases to revise the channel length or apparently reverse the "switch" portion entirely. I don't envision that happening but it's nice to know that if for some reason I just can't stop losing weight (an odd fear of mine) there's still apparently some recourse for that.

Once again thanks for all the replies. I am definitely feeling better and more confident overall! There's certainly still some 'usual' pre-surgery nerves to be sure, but perhaps not QUITE as irrational as before... ;)
 

joben

Member
Oh and - not sure if it means much or not but I guess the surgeon found some degree of acid damage or something when he did the scope. I can't remember exactly as I had JUST woken up and my wife hadn't been brought into the recovery room yet so my memory is rather foggy. But I do remember that he told me to stop eating spicy foods and prescribed some Prilosec. I don't know if that is particularly common or not? I thought I read that it's common to prescribe something similar post-op to try to minimize acid on your healing spots but I don't know. It looks like the prescription I was given is a whole year's worth so maybe they are just getting that started early or something? I'll be able to get a better idea once I get my EGD report and meet with the surgeon again.
 

southernlady

Administrator
Staff member
I guess also as I understand it the current traditional DS was first done in the 80s? So the very first patients would just now be pushing on 40ish years by this point. Given that it is not a particularly common surgery either I guess it's understandable that there aren't too many 25, 30+ years DS'ers to hear from, haha.
Yes, the first DS was done by Dr. Hess in 1986. 35 years as of now.

Now, I don’t know if Dr. Bonanni uses the Hess Method but part of your questions going forward will be how long a common channel or does he use the Hess Method. Like I mentioned, we have 2 Hess patients as members but they are in the 20 year out time frame.
Oh and - not sure if it means much or not but I guess the surgeon found some degree of acid damage or something when he did the scope. I can't remember exactly as I had JUST woken up and my wife hadn't been brought into the recovery room yet so my memory is rather foggy. But I do remember that he told me to stop eating spicy foods and prescribed some Prilosec. I don't know if that is particularly common or not? I thought I read that it's common to prescribe something similar post-op to try to minimize acid on your healing spots but I don't know. It looks like the prescription I was given is a whole year's worth so maybe they are just getting that started early or something? I'll be able to get a better idea once I get my EGD report and meet with the surgeon again.
Gerd is not uncommon. If he is willing to give you a slightly larger sleeve, that could help. Not too large though. Typical sleeve is about 80% smaller, so maybe one 70% smaller? Reports are that helps avoid acid reflux. Was this a gastroenterologist that gave you this advice? Spicy foods are not proven to cause reflux. Causes vary. I found my triggers are coffee and chocolate. Neither of which are spicy. Have you even had symptoms? If not, it could be silent reflux. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314531#causes Notice one cause is being overweight, you are addressing that issue.
 

Larra

Well-Known Member
southernlady is right that spicy foods don't cause reflux, but they can be irritating to tissue that is already irritated/damaged by reflux, so I think that's why you were given that advice. Coffee and chocolate and well known causes of reflux, as is mint and a variety of other foods that reduce the pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter and thus allow more reflux.
 

joben

Member
I don't really have many GERD symptoms. Occasionally will get heartburn at night if I eat something too close to bedtime (like, within an hour or two). Typically has to be something like pepperoni pizza or something too (both greasy and spicy) for it to really bother me. Beyond that, provided I'm not laying down to go to bed right after eating I can pretty much have whatever I like without any issues. Probably doesn't help that I'd been on a big spicy food kick in the week leading up to my scope! :p

But, like I said, my memory of that bit is pretty foggy, haha. I'm supposed to be receiving a report from their findings in the next week or so (hopefully sooner) and I'm hoping that'll tell me more.
 
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