Non-obese intestinal bypass peer reviewed journals

revisionDS

Well-Known Member
hi all,

I am trying to find some peer reviewed journals for type 2 non-obese diabetic who have intestinal bypass. these patients have great response to diabetes cure but dont lose weight (not much 20 lbs or so) I know this is done in Europe, but I cant find any journals? anyone point me in the correct location? looking for type 2 diabetes cure with intestinal bypass in non obese patients? these people get the benefits of diabetes "cure" but dont lose weight (since they dont have the sleeve I suppose) I have tried google and pubmed.
thanks everyone I appreciate it.
 

revisionDS

Well-Known Member
thank you both for posting these for me, great info and just what I was looking for, would be great if it was used more in the USA, time will tell
 

revisionDS

Well-Known Member
thank you Muchkin, that was a great story, but sad too. I am trying to find Dr Noyes in google search but have not been able to yet, but I will continue to search, do you have the title or first name by chance?
 

DianaCox

Bad Cop
Not Noyes, Noya:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15603651
Obes Surg. 2004 Nov-Dec;14(10):1354-9.
Duodenal switch without gastric resection: results and observations after 6 years.
Cossu ML1, Noya G, Tonolo GC, Profili S, Meloni GB, Ruggiu M, Brizzi P, Cossu F, Pilo L, Tilocca PL.
Author information

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
The results on metabolic effects of the classical biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) have led us to investigate the operation without gastric resection, thus preserving stomach and pylorus, in patients who are not seriously obese but suffer from hypercholesterolemia, often associated with type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia.

METHODS:
Between 1996 and 1999, we performed the duodenal switch (DS) without gastric resection on 24 mildly obese patients. Mean preoperative BMI was 36.2 kg/m(2). 17 patients (70.8%) suffered from type 1 diabetes, 4 (16.6%) had impaired glucose tolerance, while the remainder had fasting hyperglycemia. In 20 patients (83.3%), hypercholesterolemia and alterations in lipid profile were present. Another 20 patients were taking drugs for arterial hypertension. The pluri-metabolic syndrome was present in 41.6% of patients.

RESULTS:
Mean follow-up was 4 years. BMI reduction and weight loss were not large. 2 patients who had severe longstanding diabetes type 2 needed a second operation of the classical BPD because of failure in improving diabetes. Another 2 patients were changed to classical BPD because of a relapsing chronic duodeno-ileal ulcer. The incidence of ileal ulcer was 29.1%. Regarding hypercholesterolemia, hypertrigliceridemia, and type 2 diabetes when there is a good pancreatic "reservoir", the operation seems effective in the long-term. Protein absorption is better than that obtained with the classical BPD.

CONCLUSIONS:
Our long-term results suggest that in carefully selected patients suffering from serious hypercholesterolemia or type 2 diabeteswith insulin reserves still at an acceptable level, and with BMI 30-40, DS without gastric resection can be proposed as a surgical treatment for metabolic diseases but not for obesity.


There is also this very recent paper from Marceau's group:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24839191

Obes Surg. 2014 Nov;24(11):1843-9. doi: 10.1007/s11695-014-1284-0.
Biliopancreatic diversion-duodenal switch: independent contributions of sleeve resection and duodenal exclusion.
Marceau P1, Biron S, Marceau S, Hould FS, Lebel S, Lescelleur O, Biertho L, Kral JG.
Author information

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
The choice of first-stage operation in bilio-pancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) is controversial. There are no published long-term comparisons of one- and two-stage BPD-DS outcomes.

METHODS:
During 2001-2009, among 1,762 patients scheduled for BPD-DS 48 had duodenal switch (DS) and 53 sleeve gastrectomy (SG) as first-stage procedures. We compared prospectively updated outcomes of 42 DS (100 % open) and 49 SG (88 % laparoscopic), 13 of whom completed their second stage, to a control group of 91 patients with open one-stage BPD-DS.

RESULTS:
One-year mean percent excess weight loss (%EWL) was greater after SG than DS (47 ± 19 vs. 39 ± 13 SD; p = 0.01) with earlier nadir (16 ± 10 vs. 45 ± 30 months; p < 0.0001) but more rapid significant weight regain. After 5 years, %EWL was 12 ± 35 for 9 SG, 45 ± 19 for 30 DS (p < 0.0006), and 70 ± 18 for the first-stage BPD-DS (p < 0.0001). Weight loss was less after two- than one-stage procedures (p < 0.02). Comorbidities improved progressively between SG, DS and BPD-DS (p < 0.001 for trend). HbA1C decreased by 10, 19, and 31 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). Dyslipidemia was cured in 41, 82, and 100 %, respectively. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased only after DS (12 %; p < 0.0002). Patient satisfaction was similar for SG and DS but greater after BPD-DS overall (p = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:
SG and DS independently contribute to beneficial metabolic outcomes after BPD-DS. Long-term weight loss and correction of metabolic abnormalities were better after DS favoring its use as first stage in BPD-DS; one-stage BPD-DS outcomes were superior to two-staged.

AND:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24819497
Dig Surg. 2014;31(1):48-54. doi: 10.1159/000354313. Epub 2014 May 8.
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: with or without duodenal switch? A consecutive series of 800 cases.
Biertho L1, Lebel S, Marceau S, Hould FS, Lescelleur O, Marceau P, Biron S.
Author information

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) was originally performed as the restrictive and acid-reducing part of a biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS). It is now recognized as a stand-alone procedure, but direct comparison between the two procedures is still lacking. The goal of this study is to compare the outcomes of the two procedures and their respective impact on obesity-related comorbidities.

METHODS:
All patients who had a laparoscopic SG (n = 378) or a laparoscopic BPD-DS (n = 422) before 10/2011 were included in this study (n = 800). Data were obtained from our prospectively maintained electronic database and are reported as mean ± standard deviation comparing SG with BPD-DS patients.

RESULTS:
SG patients were older (48 ± 11 vs. 40 ± 10 years, p < 0.001) with a higher prevalence of comorbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus in 51 vs. 37%; hypertension 62 vs. 49%; sleep apnea 63 vs. 51%; all p < 0.001). Initial BMI was 48 ± 9 vs. 48 ± 6 (p = 0.8). There was one 30-day mortality in the BPD-DS group, from a pulmonary embolism, for an overall mortality rate of 0.13%. Thirty-day complications occurred in 6 vs. 8% of patients (p = 0.2), including gastric leaks in 4 (1%) vs. 0 patients (p = 0.049). Mean follow-up was 29 ± 10 months. Excess weight loss was 45 ± 14 vs. 62 ± 15% at 6 months, 53 ± 18 vs. 81 ± 14% at 12 months, 53 ± 23 vs. 87 ± 15% at 18 months, 50 ± 19 vs. 86 ± 15% at 24 months and 51 ± 24 vs. 83 ± 16% at 36 months (p < 0.05 for all time points). The surgery induced the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus in 56 vs. 90% of patients, hypertension in 54 vs. 76% and sleep apnea in 43 vs. 74% (all p < 0.05). In type 2 diabetic patients, fasting plasma glucose decreased by -1.9 mmol/l after SG vs. -2.9 mmol/l after BPD-DS (p < 0.05) and hemoglobin A1C by -1.1 vs. -1.9% (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:
SG results in a significant 3-year weight loss and remission of comorbidities. BPD-DS provides further improvement of associated comorbidities and can be an option for the management of insufficient weight loss or residual comorbidities following SG.


This paper did NOT show much improvement - but they did not disclose in the Abstract how long these patients were, and whether they had already become irreversibly insulin dependent diabetics - no surgery can fix that (other than islet cell transplants, which don't work yet):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19288284
World J Surg. 2009 May;33(5):972-9. doi: 10.1007/s00268-009-9968-7.
Clinical improvement after duodenojejunal bypass for nonobese type 2 diabetes despite minimal improvement in glycemic homeostasis.
Ferzli GS1, Dominique E, Ciaglia M, Bluth MH, Gonzalez A, Fingerhut A.
Author information

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains a dilemma to physicians. Although gastric bypass surgery undertaken for morbid obesity has been shown to resolve this disease well, data on the effectiveness of duodenojejunal bypass in improving or resolving T2DM and the metabolic syndrome (MS), especially in nonobese patients are scarce. This study was intended to evaluate the clinical effects of laparoscopic duodenojejunal bypass (LDJB) in patients with T2DM and a body mass index of <35 kg/m(2).

METHODS:
We conducted a 12-month prospective study on the changes in glucose homeostasis and the MS in seven T2DM subjects undergoing LDJB with similar DM duration, type of DM treatment, and glycemic control. Laboratory values including glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, and C-peptide were followed throughout the 12 months. Serum levels of gastric inhibitory peptide and ghrelin were followed for 1 month. Serum levels of gastrin and glucagon-like peptide were followed for 3 months.

RESULTS:
At 12 months after surgery, all subjects consistently felt relief from fatigue, pain and/or numbness in the extremities, polyuria, and polydypsia. Clinical resolution was obtained for one patient, and the preoperative diabetic medication requirements decreased for most of the other patients. The subjects demonstrated an overall improved HbA1c (from 9.4% to 8.5%) and fasting blood glucose level (from 209 to 154 mg/dl). Although the change in fasting blood glucose approached statistical significance, these measures of glucose homeostasis did not achieve significance. Cholesterol and triglycerides increased slightly, and C-peptide decreased slightly over 1 year. These changes were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:
Although this is a small series, our data show that at 12 months after surgery, clinical improvement was obvious in all of our seven patients, but LDJB may not be effective at inducing remission of T2DM and the MS in certain patients undergoing this operation. This suggests that larger patient studies should be conducted, before concluding that surgery may offer clinical and biochemical resolution to a disease once treated only medically. Longer follow-up is required for better evaluation.
 

revisionDS

Well-Known Member
thank again everyone, great posts everyone...and yes Muchkin that article from Noya is great, thank you Diana for posting it for me.
 

southernlady

Administrator
Staff member
Since this thread now has data linked to it, I am gonna move it to the Data section. That way it won't disappear into the nether regions as the forum grows bigger!
 
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