Book: _Big Fat Lies: The Truth about Obesity, Disease and Health_

Brandy

Freddled gruntbuggly
Amazon Link.

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Big Fat Lies: The Truth about Obesity, Disease and Health
Joey Lott

I only checked it out to read the free chapters, but with a 99 cent kindle version I ended up buying it. It's only about 100 pages and an easy read. It has all the pertinent information and in a givable form. It seems like I am forever in debate about fat stuff now. How diets don't work and how obesity epidemic is really games with math and so on. Here is a book that has all the relevant scientific studies clearly referenced and asks the most important questions like:

  • If the Journal of America Medical Association say that death rate is higher for normal BMI 18.5 to 25 than it is for overweight 25 to 35 people, why is normal considered more healthy?
  • If healthy oils are the answer, then why, despite over a 1000% increase since the 1970's in their use, are things not getting better?
  • If being fat is the problem, wouldn't liposuction make one healthy?
  • If people naturally get fatter as they get older and since the US population is ageing (baby-boomers), couldn't that explain the "Fat Epidemic?"
  • Although different populations (typically countries) definitively eat more or less fat and/or sugar, why don't their obesity rates line up like they "should"?
  • and lots more...
The thing I most liked about this book is that it reminded me of my #1 Life Lesson that I keep forgetting. "Do not believe everything that people who are selling things tell you." How so many little beliefs keep creeping in without me checking them is shameful.

The thing I disliked most about this book was the lack of mention of bariatric surgery. Seems like there are enough people out there that some lessons can be learned. For instance, if DS people malabsorb 80% of their fat then we have a population who naturally eat low fat. The fact that they are not all skinny means fat = fat is false, but how are they with cardiovascular disease? He talks about the real health issues of the SMO's but I'm curious what happens when they slim down. It probably isn't right for me to knock him for not writing the book I wanted, especially since the scientific studies are probably not there but other than stating that 150,000 get a bariatric surgery a year in the US and it's growing, he avoids the topic.
 

Georgepds

Well-Known Member
Amazon Link.


Big Fat Lies: The Truth about Obesity, Disease and Health
Joey Lott

I only checked it out to read the free chapters, but with a 99 cent kindle version I ended up buying it. It's only about 100 pages and an easy read. It has all the pertinent information and in a givable form. It seems like I am forever in debate about fat stuff now. How diets don't work and how obesity epidemic is really games with math and so on. Here is a book that has all the relevant scientific studies clearly referenced and asks the most important questions like:

  • If the Journal of America Medical Association say that death rate is higher for normal BMI 18.5 to 25 than it is for overweight 25 to 35 people, why is normal considered more healthy?
  • If healthy oils are the answer, then why, despite over a 1000% increase since the 1970's in their use, are things not getting better?
  • If being fat is the problem, wouldn't liposuction make one healthy?
  • If people naturally get fatter as they get older and since the US population is ageing (baby-boomers), couldn't that explain the "Fat Epidemic?"
  • Although different populations (typically countries) definitively eat more or less fat and/or sugar, why don't their obesity rates line up like they "should"?
  • and lots more...
The thing I most liked about this book is that it reminded me of my #1 Life Lesson that I keep forgetting. "Do not believe everything that people who are selling things tell you." How so many little beliefs keep creeping in without me checking them is shameful.

The thing I disliked most about this book was the lack of mention of bariatric surgery. Seems like there are enough people out there that some lessons can be learned. For instance, if DS people malabsorb 80% of their fat then we have a population who naturally eat low fat. The fact that they are not all skinny means fat = fat is false, but how are they with cardiovascular disease? He talks about the real health issues of the SMO's but I'm curious what happens when they slim down. It probably isn't right for me to knock him for not writing the book I wanted, especially since the scientific studies are probably not there but other than stating that 150,000 get a bariatric surgery a year in the US and it's growing, he avoids the topic.
Quick answers to an old post


If the Journal of America Medical Association say that death rate is higher for normal BMI 18.5 to 25 than it is for overweight 25 to 35 people, why is normal considered more healthy?


...because some very sick people who are wasting away might skew the results


If healthy oils are the answer, then why, despite over a 1000% increase since the 1970's in their use, are things not getting better?


...some might say (Esselstyn) that the oil itself is the problem


If being fat is the problem, wouldn't liposuction make one healthy?


.. visceral and intramuscular fat are the real health problem, liposuction only treats sub skin fat


If people naturally get fatter as they get older and since the US population is ageing (baby-boomers), couldn't that explain the "Fat Epidemic?"


.. nope.. everyone is getting fatter, even kids


Although different populations (typically countries) definitively eat more or less fat and/or sugar, why don't their obesity rates line up like they "should"?and lots more...


.,, need a bit more on this one
 

aaa

Well-Known Member
It always interested me when my father was in a nursing home that the doctors wanted the patients heavier than thinner. They said they always saw more thin patients in the hospital than those that were heavier.
 

southernlady

Administrator
Staff member
Part of that is that skinny people have no weight to really lose if really ill. Those of us that are at the top edge between normal and overweight seem to do okay.
 

Georgepds

Well-Known Member
Reminds me of Mark Twains story about the health nut and the indulger. When the indulger got sick he gave up cigars and alchol, and lived to tell the tale. When the health nut got sick, he died, Twain explains he had nothing to lighten the load, so his ship just swamped


Twain tells the story a lottttttttttt better
 
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