1. Please review your surgery details found under your profile.
  2. We have many with MIA Avatars. If you are missing yours, please reload it. Use a browser you normally do not use to check. List is in Announcements: http://bariatricfacts.org/threads/missing-avatars.5131/

IMPORTANT! Need anecdotal evidence that vets know more than surgeons

Discussion in 'Duodenal Switch' started by DianaCox, Jan 31, 2015.

  1.  
    southernlady

    southernlady Administrator Staff Member

    9,557
    5,568
    163
    EXACTLY!

    I am one who took handfuls without a problem. I am back to that BUT the first 3-6 months, I was doing good to get one at a time in, and with a sip each pill, I was always full OF FLUID.
     
    marissamast likes this.
  2.  
    newanatomy

    newanatomy Well-Known Member

    2,958
    1,773
    163
    Going back to Munchkin's list, I think that in most cases 20 days of pain meds would be excessive, not that that is what she was advocating for in every case. I do see where on occasion it would be necessary but, I would not want to freak the surgeons out with that kind of suggestion.
     
  3.  
    Munchkin

    Munchkin Full of Fairy Dust

    2,812
    2,012
    163
    Actually this is quite common. That's about what I got and I saved mine for night time. Isn't your doc one of those who gives out very little? I think this much should be available for anyone who has the surgery. If you don't need it, great!
     
    Jbandmmomma likes this.
  4.  
    newanatomy

    newanatomy Well-Known Member

    2,958
    1,773
    163
    My surgeon gave me 8 of the lowest strength pills available, the prescriptions was for 10 but the pharmacy only had 8 available. He is a nitwit when it comes to pain management. He thinks the whole world is going to become addicted. I believe it is part of the Mormon culture to protect us from ourselves in this way. As Ron White might have told him, for me, he needed to crank that shit up to a Catholic dose!
     
  5.  
    Munchkin

    Munchkin Full of Fairy Dust

    2,812
    2,012
    163
    I thought he was one who did this. 10 pills...ridiculous!

    Mine was open and I screwed up and left the hospital with nothing. Couldn't believe I had done this.

    I called the doc's office and got them to phone in a scrip to my local pharmacy. H went and picked it up. The difference was day and night...within 20 minutes the pain was gone and I was able to relax. It was wonderful.

    Pain relief in the hospital was horrible! I was on one of those pumps and you had to wake up every 10 minutes to push the button. It was just enough to take the edge off. Never enough to let you relax and sleep. More than anything else I wanted some real pain meds!

    One scrip for good pain pills does not an addict make!
     
  6.  
    more2adore

    more2adore Well-Known Member

    688
    553
    143
    Imagine a world where a doctor can't phone or fax in a prescription to a pharmacy... where you have to physically go to the doctor yourself and see the doctor to get it, no matter how you're feeling. Welcome to Australia. (At least, that's been my experience! Any other Aussies - feel free to correct me. I would LOVE to be wrong about this one and not have to go to my GP every cotton picking month to get a damn NSAID script renewed).
     
    graysland03 likes this.
  7.  
    star0210

    star0210 Well-Known Member

    836
    437
    113
    Munchkin...excellent list!
    But I don't agree that people should need narcotic pain relief for that long. I do admit though that I have a huge bias against pain pills. In addition, I think I must have a pretty high tolerance for pain or something.
    I had my surgery in Mexico and I had whatever pain meds were hooked up to my IV the first couple of days and when it finished they gave me supradol sublinguals (ketorolac) which worked fine. I was never in any pain.
    I personally believe the longer you stay on hard stuff, the slower your recovery will be.
     
  8.  
    jillc

    jillc Well-Known Member

    287
    178
    93
    Hmm, I disagree @star0210 but that's probably because my surgery was open, and I had a revision so tons of stuff was done inside. Also, when I used to work as an RMT, people have varying levels of pain tolerance and it's not a mind over matter thing. Some peoples' nerves fire at a higher rate, and they generally are more sensitive. For instance, if a person has dealt with chronic pain for a number of years, they (usually) have a higher level of pain tolerance. Conversely, the opposite.
    Anecdotally, my parents have a friend in his mid eighties who, up until a four or five ago had never felt much pain as he'd never really had much illness nor medical issues. It was a total shock to him when he started having aches and pains associated with aging. At eighty!
    So it really does depend on the person.
    I do agree that if you can cope without the pain meds, it is better to do that. I think I have about 4 pills left in my prescription, and didn't touch them much after the second week of surgery.
     
  9.  
    southernlady

    southernlady Administrator Staff Member

    9,557
    5,568
    163
    Typically I have a high tolerance for pain BUT my jaw surgery brought me to my knees...my surgeon gave me a 10 day round and I had to have him refill it for another 10 days. I didn't take all of the last 10 days. Normally, 2-3 days is all I need. That's all I needed for my back surgery, for the DS, and even for the hand surgery I just had.
     
  10.  
    revisionDS

    revisionDS Well-Known Member

    205
    79
    78
    the #1 problem for DSers is drs just don't understand what malabsorption really means, especially in reference to a DSer. I have brought in diagrams, show what part is bypassed, operative reports-you explain why calcium, fat soluble vitamins are difficult for us to absorb etc...then they RX VitD2 in oil based??? Were you completly checked out for our 15 minute converstation why that won't work? Yes for sure Drs need a good grasp on what that means. Anything that goes through our GI system-anything will not be absorbed like it was before. You are not what you eat, you are what you absorb.
     
    Elizabeth N. likes this.
  11.  
    Razbry

    Razbry Well-Known Member

    287
    166
    93
    I thought Dr Hess (now retired) had a great system for pain management. He put in a spinal block during surgery, and there it stayed for the next 10 days (length of hospital stay). I was never in any pain.
     
    graysland03 likes this.
  12.  
    DianaCox

    DianaCox Bad Cop

    4,896
    4,102
    163
    Surely you mean epidural, and not spinal ... like this thing: http://www.myon-q.com/. But why were you in the hospital for 10 days? That's awfully long - most people are in for 2-4 days with a DS.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  13.  
    graysland03

    graysland03 New Member

    1
    1
    1
    Gotta say the boxtop comment was freakin hilarious.
     
    Porkchop :) likes this.
  14.  
    Munchkin

    Munchkin Full of Fairy Dust

    2,812
    2,012
    163
    Chapter 2

    Part of your job as a DS surgeon is to assist other docs trying to learn how to manage our care. You need to do inservice lectures and actively educate your peers. I did inservice for 2 medical groups in Minnesota. For free. And if I did it, you can too. The average PCP/GP out there in the trenches knows less than nothing about the DS.

    Just today there was a long term post-op posting on FB about how he is losing all his teeth. But it can't be because of the DS. His DOCTOR told him his calcium is fine, he doesn't need to supplement at all...so this guy has never taken a calcium pill. I wonder how much bone this guy has left and I bet his PTH is off the charts. But I'm sure his DOCTOR doesn't test that. Probably doesn't know what it is. It's probably too late to save him. And I bet his supplement regime is all wrong all the time so he has other issues as well.

    Why does this happen?

    Everything in a medical group is done by the book. Literally. In the interest of saving time and increasing productivity, the doctor actually makes very few judgement calls. He/she looks up the suspected diagnosis in the book and does what the book tells him/her to do. We just need to add a few pages to the book explaining how to care for the post-op DSer.
     
    Jbandmmomma likes this.
  15.  
    Razbry

    Razbry Well-Known Member

    287
    166
    93
    You are probably right. It was a long time ago, and I wasn't clearly thinking. All I know was that it was a thin tube inserted somewhere in my back. 10 days was not uncommon for a stay in the hospital for Dr. Hess patients. He was a large fish in a small pond, and he knew how to work the insurance system.
     

Share This Page