1. Please review your surgery details found under your profile.
  2. We have many with MIA Avatars. If you are missing yours, please reload it. Use a browser you normally do not use to check. List is in Announcements: http://bariatricfacts.org/threads/missing-avatars.5131/

DSers: What do you eat? And any vegans out there?

Discussion in 'Duodenal Switch' started by Stefanie S., Aug 31, 2017.

  1.  
    Stefanie S.

    Stefanie S. Well-Known Member

    185
    59
    78
    So I'm 7 months post-op and I'd really like to get back to as close to vegan as possible. Maybe vegetarian? What do you all eat? I'm obviously not choosing right because I have constant gas... probably lactose intolerant. But when I sit down to meal plan, my mind is going blank. I'm open to ideas, meal plans, food lists!
     
  2.  
    Caitlunn

    Caitlunn Well-Known Member

    54
    42
    68
    So, I'm by no means an expert, but being mostly plant based as a DSer is a slippery slope. Especially if you have problems with dairy, I would think. To get enough protein, you would need to supplement with lots of yogurt/cheese, peanut butter, and eggs. So if we're looking at vegan options...peanut butter.

    Vegan protein shakes exist, though most of them are high in carbs, which can be a big problem in the fart department. I think my first suggestion would be to do an elimination diet, and do your best to figure out what is causing your gas! Once you find the culprit, go from there.

    I know it's hard to eat all meat all the time. For some of us, anyway. Sometimes I lose a taste for it, or just don't want to deal with the meal prep, not to mention the moral dilemma a meat based diet presents. Unfortunately, there isn't a good answer to this problem. But! I do like to have some Boca/morning Star farms stuff every now and then. Most of their options are low carb, too, which surprised me. I really like the breakfast sausage patties. You can get them at Costco, though they are still kind of expensive, even in bulk.

    I hope this helps!
     
    LindaDarnell and Stefanie S. like this.
  3.  
    southernlady

    southernlady Administrator Staff Member

    9,557
    5,568
    163
    Going vegan as a DSer is an invitation to a death sentence.

    Going vegetarian is doable AS long as eggs, dairy, and fish stay in your life.
     
  4.  
    southernlady

    southernlady Administrator Staff Member

    9,557
    5,568
    163
    As far as gas....an elimination diet. Start with going clean except for plain water and chicken or fish (NO sauces).

    Then after a day or two start adding foods.

    Common culprits: carbs of any kind, milk, sugar alcohols, sugar substitutes, some have found onions to be a trigger.
     
    LindaDarnell and Stefanie S. like this.
  5.  
    Larra

    Larra Well-Known Member

    2,571
    2,286
    163
    What @southernlady said. I appreciate the desire to be kind to all our fellow species, but having a DS is a commitment to emphasizing protein in your diet.
     
    Stefanie S. likes this.
  6.  
    Stefanie S.

    Stefanie S. Well-Known Member

    185
    59
    78
    This alone is super helpful.
     
  7.  
    Stefanie S.

    Stefanie S. Well-Known Member

    185
    59
    78
    Thank you everyone. Maybe I just needed to hear all of this again. I knew this going in. Prior to my surgery date, I was 100% vegan. But immediately after surgery, I completely switched over to meat, cheese, and eggs. But in the back of my mind, I find myself wondering if there's somehow a way to be vegan AND a DSer, while still meeting my protein needs. Perhaps I can find some sort of compromise that I can feel better about.
     
  8.  
    Spiky Bugger

    Spiky Bugger Well-Known Member

    3,636
    3,056
    163
    Whenever my gut is acting up, I have to change to steak, bacon, eggs and cheese. If I do that, my gut...and my poop...are just fine. The less I do that, the more messed up I am.

    CAVEAT--->>> I also have SIBO, small intestine bacterial overgrowth, which is usually caused by getting old, taking opioids, taking PPIs or H2 blockers in addition to certain surgeries. I fit all the categories. But the DS adds to the confusion. Meanwhile, the more "healthy" high fiber I consume, the sicker I get.

    Just be aware tbat almost anything can change post-op.
     
    Stefanie S. likes this.
  9.  
    Munchkin

    Munchkin Full of Fairy Dust

    2,812
    2,012
    163
    After you have been a DSer for, say, 5 years or so revisit this thought. At 15 years post, I could probably do it. Except for the fact I despise lentils. And love bacon.

    Right now, you still have the most malabsorbtion you will ever have and you are in your fastest weight loss phase. You haven't been a DSer long enough to really know what your protein needs are. You may be one of those people who just sails through with no issues. Or not! It's too soon to tell. Anyway, my thought is to use this time to get down to the weight you want and stay healthy. And for a DSer, a huge part of this is protein. Over time you will lose SOME of your malabsorbtion. You had the most drastic surgery there is to lose weight. Don't sabotage yourself!

    BTW, the biggest women I know right now are all vegans. They think it will help them lose weight but every single one of them is gaining. From my seat in the stands, veganism looks like the fast track to morbid obesity. And there is more and more data out there that says low sugar/low carb is the best diet plan. http://bariatricfacts.org/threads/esc-huge-diet-study-shows-carbs-not-fats-are-the-problem.5716/
     
  10.  
    Settledownnow

    Settledownnow Well-Known Member

    553
    381
    113
    Why is it important to you be a vegan or vegetarian? I recall this topic came up when you considering DS and others told you that high protein was essential. The whole "plant based diet" thing is a marketing ploy! Do not fall for it. It does not make you a better person to be a vegan.

    A compromise that might ease your mind could be to get your meat, poultry, cheese, eggs, veg, fruit, nuts, etc., from local farmers who are ethical and treat their animals humanely. Locally grown food tends to taste better and be more nutritious. Local fish markets are very aware of where fish comes from and can also fill you in on the details and the freshness factor.

    This is a great resource Eat Wild (I pulled up the NC page for you). Many farms have cooperatives where individuals/families buy a share and pick up a weekly basket of various meats and produce according to what is in season. You can even volunteer on a farm to earn a price reduction on groceries -- might be really fun to do in the summer if you have kids.
     
  11.  
    BigGeekGirl

    BigGeekGirl New Member

    28
    24
    3
    I am 12 years post op. I am sure some of my absorption is back.

    I was very low carb the first 18 months during my magic window.

    I have maintained a 225 lb loss in 12 years but was down 265 so have regained 40lbs.

    About 7 weeks ago I went 'whole food plant based'.

    I read Proteinholic and many other studies about protein goals in general. For me my surgeon had always had us aim for 75 grams a day and I can do that easily plant based.

    I am enjoying lentils, beans, tofu and lots of veggies and fruits. Sometimes I will eat a vegan processed fake meat mostly because my son and husband aren't too hip on eating veggies all day. Lol.

    I feel amazing. I drink a plant based protein drink (or eat extra tofu) on days I go to the gym.

    So I think it can be done. But I'd wait for your body to finish losing. When I was at your stage I would often eat many low carb veggies - spinach salads, peppers and a few onions, cucumbers, etc. I added in more at a couple years out.

    I plan on getting my labs done next month to see how things are. But this is the best I've felt in years and I've lost almost 20lbs.
     
    Stefanie S. likes this.
  12.  
    BigGeekGirl

    BigGeekGirl New Member

    28
    24
    3
    Vegan is a lifestyle around not harming animals and the environment. I like the suggestions you've been given to try to lessen that harm- local farms, grass fed and pastured meats. There are many unhealthy vegans. Oreo cookies are vegan. So are many processed foods. Those fake vegan meats are no healthier than real meat.

    My goal is whole food, plant based. Nothing processed.

    Again- you are too early out to get the nutrients you need from veggies but some day?

    Dr. Garth Davis and Dr. Duc Vuong are both weight loss surgeons who promote a plant based eating plan although (admittedly) neither does DS. Dr. Garth has mentioned the DSers need 30% more protein but his opinion (backed by much research -read his book) is we as a Western society eat way too much complete protein.

    At the end of the day stay on top of your labs, always.
     
    Stefanie S. likes this.
  13.  
    BigGeekGirl

    BigGeekGirl New Member

    28
    24
    3
    And in case you're curious I am food charting to make sure I'm hitting 60-90 grams a day (some more , some less)

    One day:

    Two servings old fashioned oats, half an avocado mixed in, seasoned why Cajun spice. 12 grams of protein.

    Wasabi peas (4 servings throughout the day) 20 grams of spicy protein.

    BBQ lentils, corn chips, half an avocado. 25 grams of protein

    Zoodles, red peppers and onions in tomato sauce over quinoa. 20 grams of protein.

    Spicy curried sweet potatoes

    Another day:

    Coffee with cream

    1 avacado on 2 pieces of toast, peanut butter and an apple. (15 grams of protein)

    Tofu scramble w/ peppers and onions , salsa and corn chips. (22 grams of protein)

    Mushroom / cauliflower sloppy joe (no bread), lentil pasta w/ chickpea dressing (20 grams of protein)

    Wasabi peas (3 servings) 15 grams of protein.
     
    Stefanie S. likes this.
  14.  
    southernlady

    southernlady Administrator Staff Member

    9,557
    5,568
    163
    I'm glad it's working for you but as you say, labs are important. And waiting til further out is critical.

    It's not a lifestyle we advocate as too many won't be as responsible as you seem to be.
     
    Stefanie S. and Settledownnow like this.
  15.  
    Spiky Bugger

    Spiky Bugger Well-Known Member

    3,636
    3,056
    163
    Your "menu" consists of all the things I cannot eat. Except corn chips. I can eat a few of those. The "cannot" is because of SIBO, small intestine bacterial overgrowth. The likely causes of that can include the DS, but do include aging, and the use of PPI/H2's and opioids.

    SOMETIMES, not you...not so far, proponents of a vegan lifestyle seem to consider their choices superior to the choices of others. And because of that, I may be just a tad defensive. So, just for the record, a vegan diet would render me housebound due to non-stop diarrhea, so...fuck the environment and the animals, too. It's a survival issue.

    To be honest, while a nice salad sounds great and would be a huge treat, I happen to REALLY LIKE things like ribeye and tri-tip and scrambled eggs and ham. They "cure" the diarrhea and can be found anywhere and allow me to be part of the human race, which unattended SIBO does not.

    (I may be the only one here...now...with SIBO. But, given how many here use PPIs and H2 medications and maybe opioids, and have had gastric surgery and might some day be 70 years old, too...and I want them to recognize this issue sooner rather than later.)

    Anyway, @Stefanie S. ...do your best to get in the needed protein. But if you go vegan, you HAVE TO get FREQUENT labs. We do not recover easily or quickly from deficiencies. Don't let lifestyle OR inattentive doctors cause you to get irreparably ill. Remember that having the DS without adopting the necessary diet, supplements and lab testing is suicide.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
    Stefanie S. and KathrynK like this.

Share This Page